Tag: AGU news

ESWN Events at AGU 2017

ESWN will once again be sponsoring and participating in a series of workshops, town halls, and events at the annual Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union. We hope you can join us!

Earth Science Women’s Network Annual Networking Event

Monday 12/11 | The Rusty Nail , 1102 Constance St.  | 6 – 9 PM

AGU Networking Reception for Early Career Female Scientists and Students

Tuesday 12/12 | Hilton Riverside, 1st Floor, Grand Ballroom – Suite CD | 6:15 – 8 PM

ESWN & AGU Sponsored Workshops

Wednesday 12/13 | MCCNO, Third Floor, Room 338-339

Navigating the NSF System | 9 AM – 12 PM

This workshop is open to all AGU Fall Meeting attendees and will be particularly helpful to graduate students, post-docs, researchers, and tenure-track faculty thinking about applying for NSF funding. Critique sample text from past NSF proposals, meet in groups with program officers to know what they are looking for, and learn how to ask the right questions, give the right answers, and get funded.

Strategies for Attracting and Advancing a Diverse Geoscience Workforce | 2 – 4 PM

The goals of this workshop are to (1) identify elements from successful programs for attracting and advancing historically underrepresented Earth scientists at multiple career stages and (2) identify strategies that AGU and its members can enact to broaden the participation of a diverse membership and geoscience workforce. A panel presentation will be followed by small break-out roundtable discussions centered on topics related to various career stages and professional tracks of interest.

Opportunities Beyond Academia | 4 – 6 PM

Thinking about a career outside of academia? It can often be difficult to get help finding a job in a nonprofit or government agency, within industry, or as a consultant. A panel of scientists with experience outside of academia will share their “lessons learned” and answer your questions about how to find and apply for jobs in policy, federal research labs, state agencies, NGOs, industry, and private enterprise. This year’s panelists include:

  • Ester Stzein, Assistant Director at National Academy of Sciences
  • Rachel Licker, senior climate scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists
  • Christine Wiedinmyer, Associate Director for Science at CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, former Scientist III at National Center for Atmospheric Research
  • Svetlana Shkolyar, Postdoctoral Fellow, Geophysical Lab, Carnegie Institution for Science
  • Karen Rosenlof, Meteorologist and Program Lead, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Chemical Sciences Division
  • Gyami Shretha, Director, U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office, National Coordination Office (NCO)
  • Alicia Newton, Editor at Nature Geoscience
  • Denise Hills, Geological Survey of Alabama

 

A special thanks to our sponsors!

 

In addition to the above events there are activities going on throughout the week aimed at improving the geoscience community. Many, but not all, of these events are co-organized by ESWN members:

Scientific Societies Speak Out Against Sexual Harassment

PrintLeaders from scientific societies, government agencies, and academia come together to discuss sexual harassment in the sciences

12 September 2016

WASHINGTON, DC – More than 60 leaders in science from academia, government agencies, and professional societies came together recently to address the challenge of sexual and gender-based harassment on campus, in the field, and at scientific meetings. The American Geophysical Union convened the workshop titled, “Sexual Harassment in the Sciences: A Call to Respond,” which was co-sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, American Geosciences Institute, Association for Women Geoscientists, and Earth Science Women’s Network.

Recent high-profile cases in the news have shed light on the issue of sexual harassment in science.  The participating organizations intend to release a set of guiding principles and outcomes by the end of 2016 to help scientific societies, academic institutions, and other organizations improve workplace climate, better respond to sexual harassment, and better support its victims. The workshop, held on September 9, was funded by the National Science Foundation.

harassment-web-graphic2Topics addressed included:

  • Perspectives from the University of California Joint Committee of the Administration and Academic Senate on Sexual Misconduct
  • Understanding the legal landscape
  • The sociological context and call to action
  • Establishing the desired climate and culture on campus
  • Establishing the desired climate and culture in the field
  • Role of scientific societies in establishing the desired climate and culture in science
  • Developing guiding principles for changing the culture and climate of science

Leaders of participating organizations offered the following comments:

“Sexual harassment in research settings is an affront to the profession of science and violates our ethical standards. As federal agencies have oversight authority for their funded awards, their Inspectors General should broaden the definition of research misconduct so they can investigate allegations and determine corrective actions that universities appear unwilling to take,” said Celeste Rohlfing, AAAS’ Chief Operating Officer.

“Our ACS Academic Professional Guidelines clearly state that it is the right of every individual working in the chemical sciences to have equal treatment and opportunity regardless of gender, race, national origin, religion, age, sexual orientation, gender expression and gender identity, physical disability, or any other factor not related to their position,” said Mary Kirchhoff, director of the ACS Education Division. “This right includes a workplace free of intimidation, coercion, exploitation, discrimination, and harassment – sexual or otherwise.”

“Harassment of any kind, in any workplace or place of learning is unacceptable.  Friday’s meeting was a great first step in raising awareness of a problem that has plagued the scientific community for many decades,” said AGI Executive Director (and AWG Past-President) Allyson K. Anderson Book.

“Sexual harassment is an unacceptable, yet persistent issue facing the scientific community. We need to work together to create a safe, supportive environment and culture that encourages young scientific talent rather than deterring it,” said Eric Davidson, President-elect, American Geophysical Union. “For scientific innovation to flourish, the community needs to take a powerful stance against sexual harassment and we call on our friends across other scientific organizations, research institutions, and societies to join us. It’s our responsibility to provide members, employees, and constituents with the awareness and tools needed to create an inviting, safe culture for science.”

“Sexual harassment has always been a barrier for professional women scientists, and a major deterrent to female students who are considering a career in the sciences. It is appalling that it has been prevalent in the science community for so long, and we are thrilled to finally see scientific societies and institutions coming together to address and act upon the important role we play in helping to put an end to this. I hope to see other societies and organizations rise up and join us in this effort and look forward to seeing the progress we make over the next few years,” said Blair Schneider, Association for Women Geoscientists President.

“Harassment endangers not only the personal and professional well-being of individuals but of our entire community, and is one of the reasons many young researchers leave academia and science altogether. Our hope is that professional societies can lead a cultural change and pressure academic institutions to take this problem seriously, so that everyone who wants to be in science can stay in science,” said Erika Marín-Spiotta, Leadership Board Member, Earth Science Women’s Network.

For more information, links to policy statements, and other resources related to sexual harassment in the sciences please visit: harassment.agu.org.

AGU From the Prow: Sexual Harassment and the Scientific Community

22 January 2016

By Margaret Leinen, President, American Geophysical Union, Eric Davidson, President-elect, American Geophysical Union, and Carol Finn, Past President, American Geophysical Union

UPDATE, 29 January 2016: On Thursday, 28 January, an opinion piece titled, “Steps to Building a Zero-Tolerance Culture for Sexual Harassment,” was published on Eos.org. The piece, authored by three AGU members, Erika Marín-Spiotta, Blair Schneider, and Mary Anne Holmes, outlined ways that AGU can lead the way in building an environment where sexual and other types of harassment have no place.

Sexual harassment is an issue in many disciplines, including the Earth and space sciences, and its impacts can be far-reaching. As you are no doubt aware, issues of sexual harassment in the field, in the lab, and in the classroom have been widely covered in the news lately, as have the related issues of reporting, privacy, and consequences (both for the accuser and the accused).

To be clear, for AGU, and for each one of us personally, addressing this persistent problem is an issue of critical importance. Sexual harassment is wrong, and it cannot be tolerated. If we aren’t able to provide a safe and welcoming environment in which science can thrive, then we have failed as a community.

Unfortunately, this is not a new problem, and AGU, like other science societies, has been grappling with it for some time. It’s also not an isolated problem. Sexual harassment is part of a broader set of issues facing the scientific community, which include things like gender bias and inequality, discrimination based on sexual orientation, race or ethnicity, and the safety and supportive nature of our workplaces and learning environments (bullying, etc.).

These problems are complex and not always easy to solve, but as a leader in the Earth and space science community, AGU understands that we have an important role to play. A recent activity that you may not be aware of was a Town Hall meeting we hosted at the 2015 Fall Meeting with the Association for Women Geoscientists (AWG) and the Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN). Each of us played a role in the session, which was titled, Forward Focused Ethics – What is the Role of Scientific Societies in Responding to Harassment and Other Workplace Climate Issues?  It featured several presentations and a panel discussion.

During the presentations invited speakers and leadership representatives from AGU, ESWN and AWG explored implicit bias in science and the multiplying effect that bias has on limiting professional advancement for women. They highlighted sexual assault and harassment in field camps and other field locations. They also discussed how increasing diversity in the scientific workforce and growing use of social media have contributed to the current surge in reports. The speakers provided insights, experiences, and suggestions on the role of scientific societies, how AGU and other scientific societies can help address harassment and other critical issues and AGU’s policies, practices, and mechanisms for reporting can be improved.

During the presentations invited speakers and leadership representatives from AGU, ESWN and AWG explored implicit bias in science and the multiplying effect that bias has on limiting professional advancement for women.

If you missed the Town Hall, a video recording can be found on AGU On Demand. When you log in, the video will be listed under the Science & Society channel.

In addition to the Town Hall, AGU is undertaking several other efforts focused on bringing our community together to address the issue of sexual harassment in science.

One of the more obvious is to update AGU’s own ethics (for professional conduct, in general) and behavior (for meetings, etc.) policies to strengthen our position and set clearer expectations and accountability consequences for our members. That work is underway, and we will continue to update you on its progress.

Another important effort is to bring the broader scientific community together with the hope of creating common guiding principles to inform all our policies and actions related to harassment. While our work in this area is still developing, we can tell you that AGU is committed to convening the science societies around this issue as soon as possible, and thus far, they are overwhelmingly in support of the idea. Again, as more information on this effort is available, we will update you.

Other areas being discussed include education opportunities, the development of tools/resources/best practices to be shared with academic institutions, agencies, companies and other employers, and more direct support for members who are victims of harassment.

We recognize that the way AGU moves forward in addressing the issue of sexual harassment will require feedback from and engagement with our community. As such, we want to ask you, our members, for your input. What aren’t we doing that we should be? What are other organizations or institutions doing that we should try? What are we doing well and should we be doing more of it? Please share your thoughts with us in the comments section below. If you would like to share something, but would prefer to do so privately, you can also send comments to ethics@agu.org. The AGU Council and Board will address these topics at its upcoming meetings, and your voices will be heard.

In the end, addressing the issue of sexual harassment in science is something that requires us to work together as a community – and AGU is committed to leading the way on behalf of the Earth and space science community we represent.