Women in science blog

Hi, I have started a blog on issues relevant for women in science and women (or man!) in general. I will be writing about diversity in the workplace (with particular attention to science when my experience is), work-and-life balance, gender …

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Use mentoring to fix science inequality

We suggest that mentorship is particularly important for scientists from the developing world. It can address the problem of science inequality while helping to resolve global issues.

Academics in developing countries are rarely able to take advantage of cutting-edge knowledge …

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Salary, Gender and the Social Cost of Haggling

About 10 years ago, a group of graduate students lodged a complaint with Linda C. Babcock, a professor of economics at Carnegie Mellon University: All their male counterparts in the university’s PhD program were teaching courses on their own, whereas …

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The Inquisition of Climate Science

This book is about the politics of climate change denial. James Lawrence Powell comprehensively take on the climate science denial movement and the deniers themselves, exposing their lack of credentials, their extensive industry funding, and their failure to provide any …

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The Ultimate Resource 2

Arguing that the ultimate resource is the human imagination coupled to the human spirit, economics Professor Julian Lincoln Simon led a vigorous challenge to conventional beliefs about scarcity of energy and natural resources, pollution of the environment, the effects of …

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The Control of Nature

In “The Control of Nature” writer John McFee turns his attention once more to geology and the human struggle against nature. In one sketch, he explores the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ unrealized plan to divert the flow of the …

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State of Fear

In “State of Fear” fiction writer Michael Crichton tackles global warming. Millionaire George Morton is about to donate $10 million to the National Environmental Research Fund (NERF) when he suddenly decides against it. His lawyer, Peter Evans, is as surprised …

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Silent Spring

Silent Spring is a book by Rachel Carson that was first published in three serialized excerpts in the New Yorker in June of 1962. The book appeared in September of that year and the outcry that followed its publication forced …

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Heatstroke: Nature in an Age of Global Warming

Around the world, climate change is indicated by natural events-especially in shifting migration routes-leading to results familiar (species die-out) and unexpected-like the discovery of a heretofore unprecedented “pizzly,” a bear cub with one polar parent and one grizzly. In this …

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Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast

David Archer’s book is an accessible, entertaining, but detailed account of how scientists are trying to predict future climate change. It is an excellent book and should be the first port of call for anyone wanting to delve deeper into …

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Diet for a New America

“Diet for a New America” is John Robbins expose of America’s “factory farms”. Since the 1987 publication of Diet for a New America, beef consumption in the United States has fallen a remarkable 19%. While many forces are contributing to …

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Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed

Jared Diamond’s “Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed” is a follow-up to his Pulitzer Prize winning book “Guns, Germs and Steel”. In “Collapse” the author explores how climate change, the population explosion and political discord create the conditions …

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“Negotiation Academy” Podcasts

Each podcast is about 10 minutes long, and has a mini-lesson, based on a Columbia University MBA class in negotiation.

Negotiation often comes up on ESWN discussions, and was identified as a major professional development topic in our surveys (in …

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