Author: Colleen Schmit

ESWN Hosts Science-A-Thon

ESWN is thrilled to host Science-A-Thon, a one-day celebration of science and scientists (like you!). Science-A-Thon will showcase the work of scientists over a single “day in the life.” Participants will post 12 photos over 12 hours on July 13. All participants will be raising money for ESWN. As you know, ESWN is free to join, with no dues or fees. So Science-A-Thon connects the public with the amazing scientists of ESWN and beyond, and raises much needed money to support our organization and help us maximize our impact. Science-A-Thon is open to people of all genders, any field of science, professionals, students, and folks who want to be a “#ScientistForADay”. We would love to have everyone sign up and celebrate science together! You can also encourage your colleagues, friends, and family to join and/or sponsor you.

Learn more about this fun event at scienceathon.org!

Sign up at scienceathon.org/how

Support Science-A-Thon here

ESWN Receives Special Award from American Meteorological Society

In January of 2017, the Earth Science Women’s Network received a special award from the American Meteorological Society for inspirational commitment to broadening the participation of women in the Earth sciences, providing a supportive environment for peer mentoring, and professional development. ESWN’s activities “have been shown to remove feelings of isolation and help women in the geosciences overcome barriers to professional advancement.”

Thank you to the American Meteorological Society!

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ESWN Connects with Leaders in Culture and Industry

In December 2016, ESWN was honored to meet with some of the most exciting thinkers in the U.S. to discuss taking ESWN to the next level. We were pleased to have Janice Huff (Lead Meteorologist, NBC NYC), Jon Foley (Director, CAS), Jane Francisco (Editor-in Chief, Good Housekeeping), Mike and Pam Hastings (Mike was recently CEO and President of Eco-Products, and is now on the board), Chris Olex (professional strategy and coaching), and Katharine Hayhoe (scientist, professor, ESWN member). The development committee of ESWN’s leadership board, made up of Tracey Holloway, Erika Marín-Spiotta, Melanie Harrison Okoro, and Meredith Hastings, also attended, and Tracey served as meeting chair. We were thrilled to host such a productive meeting with these thought-leaders, who contributed their valuable insights about future directions for ESWN.

The day kicked off with an incredible tour of the California Academy of Sciences, generously led by Dr. Jon Foley, the Executive Director of CAS. The tour was also attended by ESWN members, friends, and leadership board members. After the tour, the smaller group went to dinner, during which the thought-leaders generously shared their expertise about ways for ESWN to expand its impact.

Since 2002, ESWN has grown from an informal group of six women exchanging emails to an international force with over 3000 members in more than 60 countries. In 2014, ESWN became a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, allowing us to have a more formal structure. ESWN aims to continue expanding our core activities to recruit, promote, and retain women in the earth sciences, as well as grow in new directions. Our engagement with these amazing thought-leaders will help us reach these goals.

ESWN is thankful to all of you for participating in discussions on the website, attending ESWN events, and supporting women in the geosciences. ESWN’s impressive growth is not possible without all of you, so thank you!

To support ESWN, go to ESWNonline.org/give

CAS Director Jon Foley leads a special ESWN tour of the California Academy of Sciences
CAS Director Jon Foley leads a special ESWN tour of the California Academy of Sciences

 

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Jon Foley leading ESWN’s tour of CAS
The aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences
The aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences

 

CAS Director Jon Foley leading a special ESWN tour of the California Academy of Sciences
CAS Director Jon Foley leading a special ESWN tour of the California Academy of Sciences

 

Melanie Harrison Okoro, Janice Huff, Tracey Holloway, Jon Foley, Katharine Hayhoe, Erika Marín-Spiotta, Meredith Hastings, Mike Hastings, Pam Hastings, and Chris Olex at ESWN's thought-leaders dinner
Melanie Harrison Okoro, Janice Huff, Tracey Holloway, Jon Foley, Katharine Hayhoe, Erika Marín-Spiotta, Meredith Hastings, Mike Hastings, Pam Hastings, and Chris Olex at ESWN’s thought-leaders dinner

 

Melanie Harrison Okoro, Tracey Holloway, Janice Huff, and Chris Olex at ESWN's thought-leaders dinner
Melanie Harrison Okoro, Tracey Holloway, Janice Huff, and Chris Olex at ESWN’s thought-leaders dinner

ESWN at AMS Meeting 2017

dsc_0153If you are attending the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society, join ESWN at our networking reception!
ESWN Networking Reception
Monday, January 23, 2017, 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Wild Ginger, 1401 Third Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101
ESWN is excited to host a networking reception at the annual AMS Meeting in Seattle. It will be a great opportunity to meet colleagues and make new friends! FREE, all are welcome, appetizers and cash bar. For more information, contact Melissa A. Burt (melissa.burt@colostate.edu). RSVP is not required.

ESWN Welcomes New Leadership Board Members

We are excited to announce that Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, Melissa Burt, Maura Hahnenberger, Rachel Licker, Aisha Morris, and Melanie Harrison Okoro have joined ESWN’s Leadership Board! We appreciate their dedication to women in the geosciences. These amazing women join our continuing board members Tracey Holloway (President), Meredith Hastings (Vice-President), Erika Marín-Spiotta (Treasurer), Manda Adams (Secretary), Rebecca Barnes, Emily Fischer, and Christine Wiedinmyer. We also thank past Board Member Carmen Rodriguez, who is rotating off the ESWN Board after over four years of service to our community. To learn more about the new and continuing board members, check out our bios.

asmeretAsmeret Asefaw Berhe is an associate professor of soil biogeochemistry in the School of Natural Resources at the University of California, Merced. Her research primarily focuses on biogeochemical cycling of essential elements (esp. carbon and nitrogen) in the soil system and how physical perturbations in the environment (ex. erosion, fire, changes in climate) affects stability and mechanisms of stabilization of soil organic matter. Asmeret has a BSc in Soil & Water Conservation from the University of Asmara, a M.Sc. in Resource Development from Michigan State, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy, & Management from UC-Berkeley.

“I have been a member of ESWN since 2005, it has been a joy to be part of this supportive community of researchers dedicated to increasing representation and advancing careers of women in earth sciences. It was a pleasure to be invited to join the leadership board, and I am excited to do my share to advance the mission of ESWN.”

melissaburtMelissa Burt is a research scientist at Colorado State University. Her research focuses on the interactions of Arctic clouds, radiation, and sea ice, with interests ranging from cloud-radiation feedbacks, hydrological and energy cycles in climate, and climate change feedbacks. Melissa also serves as the Education and Diversity Manager in the College of Engineering and Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. In this position she is committed to improving and increasing diversity in STEM by designing programs to encourage participation, and increase access and retention for members of historically underrepresented groups. Melissa has a B.S. degree in Meteorology from Millersville University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State.

“I am very excited and honored to join the ESWN leadership board. ESWN has provided me with an exceptional network of talented and brilliant women, and more importantly a supportive and welcoming community. I look forward to contributing to more efforts aimed at increasing participation and engagement of women of color in the earth and environmental sciences.”

MauraHahnenberger_headshot_cropMaura Hahnenberger is an Assistant Professor in the Geosciences Department at Salt Lake Community College, where she teaches and advises in the Atmospheric Sciences and Geography programs in both face to face and online settings. Maura is the founder of the WaterGirls outreach program which provides middle school girls with field experiences conducting water science. She also serves on the boards of the Utah Chapter of the American Meteorological Society and the SLCC Chapter of the Utah Women in Higher Education Network. Her research and teaching interests center around natural and human-caused environmental hazards including dust storms, air pollution, and hazardous weather. She received her B.S. and M.S. in Meteorology and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Utah studying dust storms in the eastern Great Basin of Utah.

“ESWN has been a huge benefit to me as I have began my career by expanding my network of scientists and helping me connect with critical opportunities such as grants and invited talks. It has also become a place where I know I can go to get thoughtful advice and guidance as I move through my career. I am joining the ESWN board with three main goals in mind (1) expand opportunities for female scientists to network and connect with each other, both in person and virtually, (2) continue highlighting the great work that ESWN members do in their professional lives and improve recognition of that work, and (3) endeavor to help women scientists find support systems to tackle personal and professional challenges they face. ESWN has made great strides over time and I feel privileged to be part of its continued evolution.”

rlicker_picRachel Licker is an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the U.S. Department of State. Through her fellowship, Rachel works on environmental finance and the implementation of several multilateral environmental agreements. Prior to her fellowship, Rachel carried out research on the effects of climate on human migration while at a postdoc at Princeton University. Her research interests also span the effects of climate and social factors on global and regional crop production. She holds a Ph.D. in Environment and Resources and a B.S. in Biology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, as well as a M.S. in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science from Lund University in Sweden.

“I have broadened my professional network tremendously through ESWN. I believe it is an important resource for young, female scientists as they forge their career path. For example, it is a place to ask questions, learn from colleagues at a variety of career levels, and connect with women both in one’s own and varied disciplines around the world. Through my board membership, I hope to help broaden the ESWN network and continue expanding the ways in which ESWN is of service to the community. I am honored to participate and hope members will feel free to reach out with any ideas!”

aisha-morrisAisha Morris is an Education Specialist and the Director of the Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS) internship program managed by UNAVCO. Aisha’s primary area of focus is crafting strategies for attracting, training, and retaining the diverse geoscience workforce of the future. In her current position, Aisha is responsible for UNAVCO’s Geo-Workforce Development Initiative, including managing undergraduate and graduate student internship programs and supporting early career professionals as they transition into the geoscience workforce. Aisha’s graduate and postdoctoral research interests focused on the geology and evolution of volcanic terrains on Earth and terrestrial planets. Aisha earned her B.Sc. in Geology from Duke University and both her M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Geology and Geophysics from the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

“I am honored and excited to join the Leadership Board in service to the ESWN members. The ESWN continues to provide an unparalleled network of support and resources for women of all career stages in the earth sciences. I look forward to supporting the geoscience community, and particularly the ESWN, in ongoing and new initiatives to broaden participation in the geosciences.”

melanie-okoroMelanie Harrison Okoro is an environmental scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Her major research interests include understanding biogeochemical processes (flux and pools of nitrogen and phosphorus) in alluvial wetlands and aquatic ecosystems across landscapes. Melanie’s current interest also include topics related to ecosystem level impacts of pollutants on water resource and natural resource management. She has a B.S. degree in Biology from Johnson C. Smith University and a Ph.D. in Marine Estuarine and Environmental Science from the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Melanie is currently on faculty as a LEO Lecturer teaching General Ecology at the University of Michigan.

“As a research scientist, mother, and wife, I know how important it is to see women doing science and sharing their experiences with one another. The need for representation and visibility of different perspectives as we shape our vision of what a scientist looks like has reached a critical point, and ESWN provides a powerful platform and supportive network for women to share their perspectives. As an African-American woman, who has been subject to the pressures and challenges of forging a successful career as a scientist while an underrepresented minority, I value ESWN’s commitment to career development, peer mentoring and community building for women in the geosciences. I hope to continue the mission and vision of ESWN, and work with the ESWN board and members to build a supportive community and  network for women forging a career in science. One of my goals as a board member, is to reach those who most need to see themselves in science, and as scientists: those who have been traditionally underserved by science.”

ESWN Events at AGU Fall Meeting 2016

If you’ll be attending the AGU Fall Meeting, check out ESWN’s many exciting events! These events (hosted or co-sponsored by ESWN) offer our members and colleagues the opportunity to see old friends and make new connections. ESWN works to amplify the benefits of AGU, especially for women and early-career scientists. Stay tuned for updates and more information! We look forward to seeing you in San Francisco!

Thank you to the generous sponsors of ESWN’s activities at AGU!

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Tour of the California Academy of Sciences

Sunday, December 11, 2:00 – 5:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences

Join ESWN for an exciting tour of CAS, a leading planetarium, aquarium, and natural history museum all in one! Our tour will be personally led by Executive Director Dr. Jon Foley! Learn more about this incredible opportunity here.

 

Town Hall: Strategies for Attracting and Advancing a Diverse Geoscience Workforce

Monday, December 12, 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Moscone West, 2016

The geoscience workforce is one of the least diverse, despite its importance to understanding our planet’s past, present, and future. The goals of this town hall are (1) to highlight successful programs for attracting and advancing historically-underrepresented earth scientists at multiple career stages, and (2) with audience participation, identify strategies that AGU and its members can enact to broaden the participation of a diverse membership and workforce. Target audience: supervisors, heads/chairs, and anybody interested in a more inclusive earth science community. Sponsored by Earth Science Women’s Network, Association for Women Geoscientists (AWG), National Association of Black Geoscientists (NABG) and AGU.

Speakers:
Aisha Renee Morris, UNAVCO, Inc. Boulder
Seti Sidharta, Contra Costa College
Robert C Liebermann, Stony Brook University,
Ashanti Johnson, University of Texas at Arlington,
Melissa A Burt, Colorado State University

 

ESWN Networking Reception

Monday, December 12, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

The Children’s Creativity Museum Imagination Lab

ESWN’s signature annual event will be a great opportunity to meet colleagues and make new friends during the first day of the sessions! FREE, all are welcome, appetizers and cash bar.

 

Is it harassment or not? A workshop for women and men

Tuesday, December 13, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis- Golden Gate C1

Verbal and other exchanges in the workplace and education arenas are necessary but sometimes misinformed, misunderstood, misinterpreted, and/or inappropriate. This workshop will present several scenarios of actual events (with all names and locations removed), and ask workshop participants to discuss their interpretations of the events. The goals of the workshop are to 1) inform participants and workshop leaders of the possible wide variety of opinions about these events, 2) foster greater understanding of what harassment is and let participants “practice” their personal responses, and 3) encourage future conversations and interventions, should participants witness similar events. ESWN is co-sponsoring this workshop with the Association for Women Geoscientists (AWG), AGU, Society of Exploration Geophysicists Women’s Network Committee (SEG – WNC), American Association of Petroleum Geologists Professional Women in Earth Sciences (AAPG-PROWESS), University of Kansas, the Geology Associates Fund of the University of Kansas Endowment Association, and UCAR.

 

AGU Networking Reception for Early-Career Female Scientists and Students

Tuesday, December 13, 6:00 PM ­– 8:00 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis- Golden Gate B

Network with your peers at this event made especially for early career female scientists and students. Not-so-early-career women are also welcome! This event is FREE and does not require a ticket. Light refreshments will be served. This event is co-hosted by AGU, ESWN and AWG.

 

Navigating the NSF System Workshop

Wednesday, December 14, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate A

How do you make your proposal as NSF-savvy as possible? How do you best describe your broader impacts? How can you design effective integrated research? How do you identify the best program for application? What new initiatives are early career scientists eligible for at NSF? What constitutes an effective review and how are reviews considered in funding decisions? Answer these questions and meet with Program Officers at this workshop, open to all AGU Fall Meeting attendees. Come and go as you need! The workshop will feature presentations and panels from ~900-1000h on effective reviews and how they are used in funding decisions; ~1000-1100h on specific NSF opportunities for early career scientists; ~1100-1200 one-on-one or small group meetings with Program Officers from across the geosciences directorate (e.g. PLR, OCE, EAR, AGS). This workshop with NSF program officers will be particularly helpful to early-career and mid-career participants, especially graduate students, post-docs, researchers, and tenure-track faculty thinking about applying for NSF funding for the first time. FREE and open to all AGU Fall meeting attendees through a partnership of the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU.

 

Success in Scientific Publishing and Outreach

Wednesday, December 14, 2:00 – 4:00 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate A

Publishing research is essential to building a scientific career – what strategies best support your scientific productivity and career success? This panel will provide an overview of journal publication strategies, the role of non-traditional outreach platforms, and Q&A time with attendees. With a panel of experts, we will discuss solutions to conundrums facing scientists in the publishing process, with a focus on early-career scientists. How do you decide what journal to submit to? What are the best strategies for responding to reviewer comments – especially if you disagree? Does the choice of journal affect the design of a study? How do blogs, Twitter, and videos change the nature of scientific publishing? FREE and open to all AGU Fall meeting attendees through a partnership of the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU.

 

Opportunities Beyond Academia Workshop

Wednesday, December 14, 4:00 – 6:00 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate A

This workshop will discuss practical skills for making the transition to successful post-graduate careers in policy, federal research labs, state agencies, NGOs, industry, and private enterprise and is geared towards graduate students and post-docs who are considering options outside of academia, as well as faculty who are interested. FREE and open to all AGU Fall meeting attendees through a partnership of the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU.

Confirmed panelists:

Melanie Harrison Okoro, environmental scientist at U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the National Marine Fisheries Service
Melanie Mayes, senior staff scientist and team leader, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Dawn Wright, chief scientist at ESRI
Yolanda Shea, physical scientist at NASA Langley Research Center
Teamrat A. Ghezzehei, associate professor at UC Merced, former scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Julia Rosen, freelance science journalist
Matt Coleman, portfolio analyst at Nephilia Advisors, LLC
Zhao Liu, senior research scientist at FM Global
Mika McKinnon, freelance science writer
Nadine Schneider, research coordinator at the Excellence Cluster CliSAP in Hamburg
Idalia Perez, scientist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

 

Town Hall: Awards & Grants – Advancing Your Early Earth Science Career: Multi-agency Perspectives

Thursday, December 15, 18:15 PM – 19:15 PM

Moscone West, 2020

Career development and success in science is achieved with early knowledge & skills to navigate pathways to successful grants & awards. This town hall will help graduate students & scientists at all levels understand this navigation & help diversify the talent pool for such opportunities. Jointly organized by the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program & Earth Science Women’s Network, this event will provide information on pre- & post-doctoral research grants, Early Career Awards & other federal grant opportunities. Program managers from U.S. funding agencies will provide tips for maximizing success, including pathways for accessing information & engaging with funding agencies.

 


The following event is organized by ESWN Members.

Continuing geoscience and diversity work in a changing world

Wednesday, December 14, 7:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Jillian’s Metreon Center

This is a panel/Q&A event that we hope will be the beginning of a larger effort to coalesce community discussions, concerns, resources, and actions. We want to hear from you! Fill out the survey and help us determine the most important issues to address at this first meeting:
http://z.umn.edu/cgdsurvey

We as a community can weather any storm. What are the steps we can take as individuals, as institutions, as funding agencies, as private citizens, to keep science strong amidst ever-changing political landscapes? How can we support and advance the vulnerable members of our community during even higher-pressure, more-competitive times? What progress has been made in recent years and how can we build on and protect these gains? These issues affect scientists of any nationality, any party, working in any part of the world.

Special ESWN Tour of the California Academy of Sciences

cas_candid_group_2015_eswnpicJoin ESWN for an exciting tour of the California Academy of Sciences (CAS), a leading planetarium, aquarium, and natural history museum all in one! Our tour will be personally led by Executive Director Dr. Jon Foley. Jon has been a long-time supporter of ESWN, and hosted a fantastic tour for our group in 2015. He will talk about science outreach, his transition from a career in academia to museum director, the role of museums in research and public education, and more! This will be an excellent opportunity to meet other ESWN members and supporters, and you will go behind the scenes at one of the top science museums in the world! It will be an incredible experience!

This amazing event is for a small group (15 sign-ups max). A $100 minimum donation to ESWN is required per person. Click here to donate via PayPal. These contributions will be used to help fund other ESWN activities at AGU and beyond. Anyone is welcome to participate in the tour, whether ESWN members, 12373274_10206315298659235_8952946168030885548_n12376030_10206315297939217_3343626397090524328_nguests, or others interested in science and diversity. The tour will take place on Sunday, December 11, 2016, from 2pm to 5pm. Attendees are responsible for transportation to the museum, located in Golden Gate Park. We will help connect participants interested in sharing Ubers.

All spots for the 2016 tour of CAS have been filled. Thanks to all who signed up! We are looking forward to seeing you at this awesome behind–the–scenes tour!

Scientific Societies Speak Out Against Sexual Harassment

PrintLeaders from scientific societies, government agencies, and academia come together to discuss sexual harassment in the sciences

12 September 2016

WASHINGTON, DC – More than 60 leaders in science from academia, government agencies, and professional societies came together recently to address the challenge of sexual and gender-based harassment on campus, in the field, and at scientific meetings. The American Geophysical Union convened the workshop titled, “Sexual Harassment in the Sciences: A Call to Respond,” which was co-sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, American Geosciences Institute, Association for Women Geoscientists, and Earth Science Women’s Network.

Recent high-profile cases in the news have shed light on the issue of sexual harassment in science.  The participating organizations intend to release a set of guiding principles and outcomes by the end of 2016 to help scientific societies, academic institutions, and other organizations improve workplace climate, better respond to sexual harassment, and better support its victims. The workshop, held on September 9, was funded by the National Science Foundation.

harassment-web-graphic2Topics addressed included:

  • Perspectives from the University of California Joint Committee of the Administration and Academic Senate on Sexual Misconduct
  • Understanding the legal landscape
  • The sociological context and call to action
  • Establishing the desired climate and culture on campus
  • Establishing the desired climate and culture in the field
  • Role of scientific societies in establishing the desired climate and culture in science
  • Developing guiding principles for changing the culture and climate of science

Leaders of participating organizations offered the following comments:

“Sexual harassment in research settings is an affront to the profession of science and violates our ethical standards. As federal agencies have oversight authority for their funded awards, their Inspectors General should broaden the definition of research misconduct so they can investigate allegations and determine corrective actions that universities appear unwilling to take,” said Celeste Rohlfing, AAAS’ Chief Operating Officer.

“Our ACS Academic Professional Guidelines clearly state that it is the right of every individual working in the chemical sciences to have equal treatment and opportunity regardless of gender, race, national origin, religion, age, sexual orientation, gender expression and gender identity, physical disability, or any other factor not related to their position,” said Mary Kirchhoff, director of the ACS Education Division. “This right includes a workplace free of intimidation, coercion, exploitation, discrimination, and harassment – sexual or otherwise.”

“Harassment of any kind, in any workplace or place of learning is unacceptable.  Friday’s meeting was a great first step in raising awareness of a problem that has plagued the scientific community for many decades,” said AGI Executive Director (and AWG Past-President) Allyson K. Anderson Book.

“Sexual harassment is an unacceptable, yet persistent issue facing the scientific community. We need to work together to create a safe, supportive environment and culture that encourages young scientific talent rather than deterring it,” said Eric Davidson, President-elect, American Geophysical Union. “For scientific innovation to flourish, the community needs to take a powerful stance against sexual harassment and we call on our friends across other scientific organizations, research institutions, and societies to join us. It’s our responsibility to provide members, employees, and constituents with the awareness and tools needed to create an inviting, safe culture for science.”

“Sexual harassment has always been a barrier for professional women scientists, and a major deterrent to female students who are considering a career in the sciences. It is appalling that it has been prevalent in the science community for so long, and we are thrilled to finally see scientific societies and institutions coming together to address and act upon the important role we play in helping to put an end to this. I hope to see other societies and organizations rise up and join us in this effort and look forward to seeing the progress we make over the next few years,” said Blair Schneider, Association for Women Geoscientists President.

“Harassment endangers not only the personal and professional well-being of individuals but of our entire community, and is one of the reasons many young researchers leave academia and science altogether. Our hope is that professional societies can lead a cultural change and pressure academic institutions to take this problem seriously, so that everyone who wants to be in science can stay in science,” said Erika Marín-Spiotta, Leadership Board Member, Earth Science Women’s Network.

For more information, links to policy statements, and other resources related to sexual harassment in the sciences please visit: harassment.agu.org.

Share Your Photos with ESWN!

ESWN now has a Flickr group, with the goal of building a cool image archive for our shared use, outreach, and fundraising activities (with credit of course!). We are inviting you to contribute not just photos, but also plots, images, model simulations, and more! Each post should show an image related to science, accompanied by a first-person note describing the image and/or backstory from the scientist/artist. You can see examples from our 2015 ESWN greeting cards. ESWN might use your contributed photo for notecards, on our website, or in our printed materials. There will be no payment for submitting a photo, but this will be a fun way to share your photos, stories, and work with ESWN members, so we can learn more about each other!

Our goal is to promote your awesome science and support your fellow scientist women! We are looking forward to seeing your photos! Read more and submit your photos, plots, images, etc. here!

 

Photo collage 2x6 number6 for Flickr post

 

ESWN Leadership Board Meeting at Brown University

Erika Marin-Spiotta, Becca Barnes, Emily Fischer, and Tracey Holloway participated in a panel discussion about getting on and succeeding on the tenure track, which was moderated by Meredith Hastings. This panel of ESWN Leadership Board Members was part of the Young Scholars Conference.
Erika Marin-Spiotta, Becca Barnes, Emily Fischer, and Tracey Holloway participated in a panel discussion about getting on and succeeding on the tenure track, which was moderated by Meredith Hastings. This panel of ESWN Leadership Board Members was part of the Young Scholars Conference.

Brown University hosted our ESWN Leadership Board Meeting in May. ESWN contributed to the Young Scholars Conference, which was a professional development workshop designed for senior graduate students and postdocs who are interested in an academic career in the sciences (especially Chemistry, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Planetary Sciences, Ecology, Applied Math, and Environmental Engineering). Program activities included professional development, panel discussions, and opportunities to meet with Brown University faculty and administrators. ESWN Leadership Board members held a panel discussion, where Meredith Hastings moderated a discussion about getting on and succeeding on the tenure track, with Tracey Holloway, Emily Fischer, Becca Barnes, and Erika Marin-Spiotta. Representing both large research universities (University of Wisconsin—Madison and Colorado State University) and a small liberal arts college (Colorado College), the panel was able to share personal stories, lessons learned, and behind-the-scenes tips. With a lively question-and-answer format, the panel addressed questions such as “what are search committees really looking for?” “how do you design a research program?” and “when is the right time to go on the job market?” The panel got great reviews from attendees, and it was a lot of fun for the ESWN Board!

While together at Brown, ESWN’s Leadership Board had productive meetings about fundraising and exciting future ESWN activities. Thank you to Brown University for hosting!

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ESWN’s Leadership Board: Emily Fischer, Christine Wiedinmyer, Tracey Holloway, Erika Marin-Spiotta, Meredith Hastings, Carmen Rodriguez, Becca Barnes, and Manda Adams

ESWN Launches Endowment Campaign

PrintThe Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN) is pleased to announce a major grant from the Madison Community Foundation (MCF) in Madison, Wisconsin. The $50,000 grant from MCF will provide “match” to incentivize donors to invest in the future of ESWN through a new endowment, such that every $20 donated becomes $30 of endowment support for ESWN. At the end of the ESWN endowment campaign, our goal is to reach $150,000 in the MCF endowment fund.

Depending on the annual interest rate, revenue from this endowment will generate $5,000 to $9,000 per year for ESWN. The endowment will provide a permanent revenue stream for ESWN, allowing our organization to sustain its support for women in the geosciences.

At this stage of ESWN’s growth, the endowment will ensure that ESWN “keeps the lights on” – namely, that the social networking website where our members connect will stay online. This support will also help fund our presence at the annual Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the largest meeting of geoscientists in the world. The annual AGU Meeting offers one of the largest opportunities for our members to meet in person, and allows ESWN to serve the broader geoscience community with professional workshops and other events.

ESWN is a peer-mentoring network, serving early-career scientists worldwide, and providing a community for women in science at all stages. This new endowment campaign is the second time in ESWN’s 13-year history where the organization has asked its membership to donate to a major fundraising effort. In 2014, ESWN raised nearly $14,000 in one month, from almost 300 donors, with most donors ESWN members. Those funds supported ESWN in becoming a 501c3 non-profit, and this success was reported in Nature. ESWN has also benefited from generous support from the National Science Foundation, the UW-Madison 4W Initiative for Women and Wellbeing and Global Health Institute, Elsevier, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Nature Geoscience, the California Academy of Sciences, and the AGU.

With core expenses paid for from the sustainable endowment revenue, ESWN’s Leadership Board can focus our fundraising efforts in new directions, such as scholarships, travel awards, and professional development opportunities.

The grant from MCF aims to engage both ESWN members and the broader public as donors, allowing each contributed dollar to go further. We have three main goals with this endowment campaign: 1) Reach the $100,000 goal, which will yield a $150,000 endowment; 2) Engage our members as donors, with at least 10% of ESWN members contributing; 3) Increase the visibility of our organization and members. With increased press coverage and media engagement, we aim to change public perceptions of scientists, showcase role models for girls considering science and engineering, and raise awareness about opportunities and challenges for women in these fields.

For smaller non-profits such as ESWN, it is common for a community foundation like MCF to hold and manage the endowment. For ESWN, MCF is a perfect fit. Although ESWN is an international organization, the organization is incorporated in Wisconsin, and MCF is one of a very few community foundations that offers this generous type of endowment funding. ESWN is very grateful to MCF, and excited about this new step.

By establishing an endowment, the longevity and mission of ESWN can be advanced to serve generations of scientists. Many of the most urgent challenges facing society are connected to the geosciences, including energy production, responding to climate change, natural resource management, and natural disaster forecasting. Consistent with many other areas of science and engineering, women continue to be largely under-represented in the geosciences. This lack of diversity has implications for innovation, and limits the human potential applied toward science, problem-solving, and sustainability. ESWN increases retention of women in the geosciences by facilitating and supporting professional person-to-person connections. Personal networks result in a more rewarding professional experience for women, relieving feelings of isolation and building lasting support systems capable of sustaining careers.

All donations are tax deductible and eligible for donation matching programs run by many employers. To help ESWN reach the goal of raising $100K, visit http://eswnonline.org/give.

ESWN Member Greeting Cards

Congratulations to the winners of the first ever ESWN photo competition! In October, we announced our first ever competition, and amazing 40 photos were submitted and voted on by our members. The fantastic winning photos are featured below.

ESWN has created greeting cards featuring these photos taken by our members during their research. At the AGU Fall Meeting, bundles of these notecards will be given as a thank-you gift to ESWN’s donors (this could be you, just click here!). You can support women in science and receive great gifts for the holidays!

These greeting cards are a wonderful snapshot of the exciting science our members are working on! The following photos, all submitted by ESWN members, appear on the front of the greeting cards, and the descriptions are printed on the back side. The cards are blank on the inside. Thanks to everyone who sent us their photos!

PO_425x55“My brother took this photo of me servicing an eddy covariance tower in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California above a rice field where we have been measuring greenhouse gas exchange for multiple years now. This was a special day because it was the first time my brother came to the field with me and learned about what I do as a scientist.”

Photo submitted by Patricia Oikawa, PhD.                                                                                Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley

SS_425x55“This photo was taken near Bermuda in the Sargasso Sea (Atlantic Ocean) on a research cruise that occurred during my Ph.D. program.  The laboratory was on the R/V Oceanus out of Woods Hole Oceanography Institute to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of phytoplankton and bacteria in the surface oceans, and how the presence of trace metals and elements might affect their growth.”

Photo submitted by Stephanie Shaw, PhD.                                                        Senior Technical Leader, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

KD_425x55“I took this photo of the Short Cloud Forest in 2008, on Pico del Este in the El Yunque National Forest in Luquillo, Puerto Rico. We were studying the effect of low and fluctuating redox potential on microbial carbon cycling and decomposition. This site is at the extreme end of an elevational gradient of rainfall and soil moistures, which receives an average of 4 meters of rain per year!”

Photo submitted by Kristen DeAngelis, PhD.                                                  Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst

SD_425x55“These sea urchins have covered themselves in debris to hide during low tide at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area in Newport, Oregon.  I visited the tide pools in March 2015 on a field trip with my introductory oceanography students from Portland Community College.”

Photo submitted by Sharon Delcambre, PhD.                                                   Instructor, Portland Community College

 

CW_425x55

“This is a photo of hand-dyed batik fabrics made by women from a career training center in Navrongo, Ghana. I had the opportunity to take this photo while doing field work in the area. The research I lead in Ghana is investigating the ways people cook (traditionally over open fire), the smoke emissions from these activities, and how human health and air quality is impacted. Check out more about the project: Research Of Emissions, Air Quality, Climate, And Cooking Technologies In Northern Ghana (www.reaccting.com).”

Photo submitted by Christine Wiedinmyer, PhD.                                                  Scientist III, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

AG_425x55“Askja volcano in Iceland is an excellent place to study the deposits of eruptions that occurred under an ice sheet. The rocks that are exposed in the steep walls of the caldera were formed during the last glacial period. More recent eruptions have dramatically cut through the deposits to form the caldera, which now hosts a lake. Photo taken July 2010 during my PhD work.”

Photo submitted by Alison Graettinger, PhD.                                                                          Postdoctoral Associate, SUNY Buffalo

 

  Generous sponsorship of these greeting cards provided by Elsevier   elsevier

AGU Town Hall Meeting on Harassment

ESWN is co-sponsoring a town hall meeting on harassment at the 2015 Fall AGU Meeting.

Forward Focused Ethics – What is the Role of Scientific Societies in Responding to Harassment and Other Workplace Climate Issues?

Wednesday, 16 December, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Location: Moscone South, Gateway Ballroom, Room 102

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/event/forward-focused-ethics/

Abstract: Recent high-profile events in the news have raised awareness of the problem of harassment (including sexual harassment) in science and academia. These events have highlighted the need for support mechanisms for the targets of inappropriate behavior, as well as the need for a suitable institutional response to deter continued misconduct. Harassment can affect the personal and professional well-being of scientists when perpetrated by people in positions of power upon those in more vulnerable positions. This professional misconduct often preferentially targets women, although men can also be victims of harassment. Research confirms the extent of harassment in academic environments and in disciplines with low diversity, where the lack of established support networks can lead to feelings of vulnerability and professional insecurity. Another problem identified by research on harassment is the scarcity of well-defined resources for reporting and responding to inappropriate behavior, and the perceived risk that the victims’ careers may be jeopardized if they speak out. This session will provide information on lessons learned from recent research on the prevalence of sexual harassment in the scientific community, and discuss examples of institutional and individual responses. This will be an interactive session, and will seek input from participants on suggested actions for the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and other scientific societies in helping to address and correct these issues. This town hall session is jointly sponsored by the AGU, the Association for Women Geoscientists (AWG), and the Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN).

Confirmed Speakers- Leaders of the sponsoring societies (Erika Marín-Spiotta from ESWN) plus:

Dr. Christine Williams, Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology, University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Williams is an expert on gender, race and class inequality in the workplace and has done extensive research on sexual harrassment.

Dr. Meg Urry, Israel Munson Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Chair of the Department of Physics at Yale University, Director of the Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics and President of the American Astronomical Society (AAS)

Dr. Mary Anne Holmes, Professor of Practice in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and author “Women in the Geosciences – Practical, Positive Practices towards Parity.”

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-22 at 9.51.36 AMlogo horizontalAWG logo

ESWN Workshops at AGU 2015

The Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN) is hosting two professional development workshops at the AGU Fall Meeting in 2015: Navigating the NSF System and Opportunities Beyond Academia. ESWN has been leading professional networking activities at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco since 2006. ESWN works to amplify the benefits of AGU, especially for women and early-career scientists. We structure effective and meaningful opportunities for networking, engagement, and learning, and we have become a major partner with AGU in their early-career and diversity activities since 2010. Both workshops below are FREE and open to all AGU Fall Meeting attendees through a partnership of the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU Education. We hope to see you at ESWN’s professional development workshops or at some of our other events during the Fall Meeting!

 

Navigating the NSF System

Wednesday, December 16, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate A

https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/event/navigating-the-nsf-system-workshop/

This workshop is designed to provide information for creating effective submissions to NSF, learning more about new initiatives as well as early career specific options, and connecting directly with NSF program officers. The typical schedule is listed below. This workshop is open to everyone, and please come and go as you need.

0900 – 0915: Introduction and Welcome

0915 – 1020: What constitutes an effective review? How do you make your proposal as NSF-savvy as possible? How do you best describe your broader impacts? What is cutting edge in data management? How do you identify the best program for an application? How do you access available education and outreach funds?

1020 – 1100: What new initiatives have been launched at NSF recently? How are initiatives different than core programs? How can you design effective integrated research? What option are available for early career scientists specifically and what are the criteria? (e.g., post-doctoral fellowships, AAAS fellowships and CAREER awards)

1100 – 1200: Meet in small groups with program officers; get to know what they are looking for; and learn how to ask the right questions, give the right answers, and get funded. A list of program officers who plan to attend will be made available as soon as possible (likely very close to the meeting time as federal employees will not know if they can travel until we have a new, committed federal budget!).

 

Opportunities Beyond Academia

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate A

Wednesday, December 16, 4:15 – 6:15 PM

https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/event/opportunities-beyond-academia/

Thinking about a career outside of academia? It can often be difficult to get help finding a job in a non-profit or government agency, within industry, or as a consultant – after all your advisor is an academic and most likely doesn’t have “first-hand knowledge.” Maybe you want to stay in academia but are interested in working as a consultant or even starting your own business. This workshop will discuss practical skills for making the transition to successful post-graduate careers (yes, there is life after the MS/PhD!). A panel of scientists with experience outside of academia will share their “lessons learned” and answer your questions about how to find and apply for jobs in policy, federal research labs, state agencies, NGOs, industry, and private enterprise. Geared towards graduate students and post-docs who are considering options outside of academia, as well as faculty who are interested; all are invited.

Confirmed Panelists

Dr. Kate Hibbert, Publisher at Elsevier

Dr. Alicia Newton, Senior Editor at Nature Geoscience

Dr. LaToya Myles, Lead Research Physical Scientist at NOAA/ARL/ATDD

Dr. Dawn Wright, Chief Scientist at ESRI

Dr. Vanessa Bailey, Deputy Division Director at Pacific Northwest National Lab

Dr. Benét Duncan, Associate Scientist at California Ocean Science Trust

Dr. Mona Behl, Director at Georgia Sea Grant College Program

Carolyn Wilson, Geoscience Workforce Analyst, American Geosciences Institute

Dr. Sarah Barrett, Earthquake Specialist, Swiss Re America Holding Corporation

 

Thank you to the generous sponsors of ESWN’s activities at AGU!

AGU 15 sponsors logos

 

ESWN Events at AGU Fall Meeting 2015

logo horizontalAGUlogo

If you are going to AGU, check out the line-up of ESWN’s many exciting events! We look forward to seeing you in San Francisco. ESWN is hosting or co-sponsoring many exciting events, offering our members and colleagues the opportunity to see old friends and make new connections. ESWN works to amplify the benefits of AGU, especially for women and early-career scientists.

Thank you to the generous sponsors of ESWN’s activities at AGU!

AGU 15 sponsors logos

 

Tour of the California Academy of Sciences

Sunday, December 13, 2:00 – 6:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences

Special Fundraising Event

Join ESWN for this exciting tour of CAS, a leading aquarium, planetarium, and natural history museum all in one! Our tour will be personally led by Dr. Jon Foley – Executive Director and William R. and Gretchen B. Kimball Chair of CAS, star scientist, and long-time supporter of ESWN. Our mini-bus will pick you up and drop you off at your hotel. This amazing event is for a small group (20 max). A $100 minimum donation to ESWN is required per person to cover the cost of the mini-bus and provide much-needed revenue to support ESWN activities. Anyone is welcome to participate, whether ESWN members, guests, or others interested in science and diversity.

To sign up, go to http://www.signupgenius.com/go/20f0e49aeaa2da1f94-special

To pay, go to http://eswnonline.org/give/

 

ESWN Networking Reception

Monday, December 14. 6:00 – 8:00 PM

The Children’s Creativity Museum Imagination Lab

ESWN’s signature annual event will be a great opportunity to meet colleagues and make new friends during the first day of the sessions! FREE, all are welcome, cash bar and appetizers.

 

AGU Networking Reception for Early-Career Women

Tuesday, December 15, 7:00 – 9:00 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate B

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/event/networking-reception-for-early-career-female-scientists-and-students/

Network with your peers at this event made especially for early career female scientists and students. Not-so-early-career women are also welcome! This event is FREE and does not require a ticket, even though the AGU registration says it is sold out. Light refreshments will be served. This event is co-hosted by ESWN.

 

Navigating the NSF System

Wednesday, December 16, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate A

https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/event/navigating-the-nsf-system-workshop/

This workshop with NSF program officers will be particularly helpful to early-career and mid-career participants, especially graduate students, post-docs, researchers, and tenure-track faculty thinking about applying for NSF funding for the first time. FREE and open to all AGU Fall meeting attendees through a partnership of the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU Education.

 

Career Opportunities Networking Lunch

Wednesday, December 16, 12:30 – 1:30 PM

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate C1-C3

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/event/career-opportunities-networking-lunch/

Practice your networking skills and find out about careers in a wide range of employment sectors, from national labs and government agencies to industry, consulting, and non-governmental organizations. Here’s your chance to find out about a career you hadn’t thought of (or even heard of)! This lunch is co-hosted by ESWN and is ticketed by AGU ($5).

 

Opportunities Beyond Academia

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate A

Wednesday, December 16, 4:15 – 6:15 PM

https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/event/opportunities-beyond-academia/

This workshop will discuss practical skills for making the transition to successful post-graduate careers in policy, federal research labs, state agencies, NGOs, industry, and private enterprise and is geared towards graduate students and post-docs who are considering options outside of academia, as well as faculty who are interested. FREE and open to all AGU Fall meeting attendees through a partnership of the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU Education.

 

Reception at AGU 2014

ESWN structures effective and meaningful opportunities for networking, engagement, and learning, and we have become a major partner with AGU in their early-career and diversity activities since 2010.

“Down to Earth: informal networking for female geoscientists”

Circle Logo VirgoESWN was featured in an article published in Research Professional about the value of informal networking. The article celebrates ESWN’s discussions about professional and personal matters, and the involvement of people around the world at various stages of their careers.

Read the full article here.

The paper “The Earth Sciences Women’s Network (ESWN): Community-driven mentoring for women in the atmospheric sciences,” from the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, is mentioned in this article.

Meredith Hastings Receives AGU Atmospheric Sciences Ascent Award

Meredith HastingsMeredith Hastings, an ESWN Leadership Board Member, has received a 2014 Atmospheric Sciences Ascent Award from the American Geophysical Union (AGU). This award recognizes the research contributions of exceptional mid-career scientists in the fields of atmospheric and climate sciences. Meredith won an Ascent Award “for increasing our understanding of the interlocking nature of the chemistry of the atmosphere, biosphere and climate and the role humans play in the interconnection.”

Congratulations, Meredith!

You can read more about the AGU Atmospheric Sciences Ascent Awards here.

ESWN Volunteer Opportunities

413890088ESWN has a wide variety of volunteer opportunities available. Please email us if you are interested in getting involved in any of these opportunities:

 

– Discussion leader for online forums: respond to posts to make sure that questions are answered and discussions keep going

            -Contact Erika Marín-Spiotta

– Member of Awards Committee: work to improve the number of women receiving awards by dividing and conquering the work of nominating. For example, one person leading each nomination, one person helping to draft text, one person contacting the letter writers. NOTE: AGU Union nominations due March 15 so this is a time-sensitive project, although other programs have nominations through the year

            -Contact Tracey Holloway

– Design and/or marketing volunteers: Help us design materials, write up information for our website, fundraising, reaching out to students and new members – designer, writers, or anyone with PR or marketing experience would be great!

            -Contact Manda Adams

– Web content developer: think up and write up cool stories, resources, etc. to post on the ESWN website

           -Contact Becca Barnes

– Job resource helper: help with ES_Jobs_Net mailing list, posting jobs, coordinating ESWN web site with ES_Jobs_Net email list

            -Contact Christine Wiedinmyer

– Event organizer: help organize a reception or a workshop at your home institution, or a professional meeting – this could be a small coffee gathering, or helping with larger ESWN events at AGU or EGU

            -Contact Carmen Rodriguez

– Regional contact person: a person who helps engage ESWN members in a city or region

            -Contact Emily Fischer

– Fundraising: come up with ideas of ways for ESWN to contact potential donors and raise money

            -Contact Meredith Hastings

– Newsletter: help write sections of the newsletter. Currently our newsletter comes out once a year, but we would like it to be three times a year.

            -Contact Carmen Rodriguez

– Diversity Coordinator: identify ways to effectively connect with other diversity groups in the earth sciences and broaden the reach of ESWN’s resources to increase diversity of all aspects in our disciplines.

            -Contact Erika Marín-Spiotta and Manda Adams

AGU blog celebrates Women’s History Month and ESWN

Laura GuertinESWN member Laura Guertin, a blogger for AGU, recently featured ESWN in her post celebrating Women’s History Month.

“For the month of March, in honor of Women’s History Month, I am dedicating my weekly blog posts to the outstanding organizations, resources, and inspiring stories about women in STEM.

I can’t think of a better way to kick off Women’s History Month than to celebrate the incredible impact the Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN) has made on the careers of over 2,000 female students, faculty, and researchers across the globe.”

Check out the full article here.

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ESWN Events at AGU 2014

Screen Shot 2014-11-22 at 9.51.36 AMIf you are going to AGU, check out ESWN’s professional development workshops: Navigating the NSF System, Getting on the Tenure Track and Succeeding, and Opportunities Beyond Academia. ESWN is also involved in the workshop, Improving Your Success for AGU Honors: Tips, Tools, and Tactics. There will be an icebreaker on Monday at 6-8 PM and a networking reception for early-career women on Tuesday at 6-7 PM. All events are open to all and free! We hope to see you at AGU!

Improving Your Success for AGU Honors: Tips, Tools, and Tactics

10:00 – 11:30 AM, Monday, December 15

SF Intercontinental, Grand Ballroom, Open to All

AGU’s Honors and Recognition Committee, in partnership with ESWN (Earth Science Womens Network) and AGU volunteers, will host this inaugural workshop. The workshop is focused on discussing best practices for nominating or being nominated for AGU honors and will offer tools, tips, and tactics. The three topics of the workshop are: (1) how to increase diversity of nominations, (2) how to submit a successful nomination from the nominator’s perspective, and (3) what constitutes a good nomination package from a selection committee’s perspective. The workshop is open to all AGU members and stakeholders. It is part of a larger AGU effort to support all nominators and nominees and strengthen the long-term diversity of nominations and awardees of AGU’s honors and recognition program. Please join us for light snacks, drinks, and a healthy collaborative discussion with your colleagues!

 

AGU Ice Breaker

6:00 – 8:00 PM, Monday, December 15

Moscone South, Hall C: Exhibit Hall, Open to All

An opportunity to meet colleagues and new friends during the first day of the sessions. Look for the ESWN sign to meet up!

 

Networking Reception for Early-Career Female Scientists and Students

6:00 – 7:00 PM, Tuesday, December 16

Westin Market Street, Metropolitan Ballroom 1&2

Network with your peers at this event made especially for early career female scientists and students. Created in partnership with the Association for Women Geoscientists (AWG) and the Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN), this reception will be hosted by Executive Director/CEO of AGU Chris McEntee, AGU President Carol Finn, and AGU President-elect Margaret Leinen. Tickets are free. Light refreshments will be served.

 

Navigating the NSF System

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM, Wednesday, December 17th

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate C2, Open to All 

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2014/events/the-earth-science-womens-network-presents-navigating-the-nsf-system-workshop/

How do you make your proposal as NSF-savvy as possible? How do you best describe your broader impacts? What is cutting edge in data management? How do you identify the best program for application? How do you access available education and outreach funds? There are always new initiatives starting at NSF, beyond core programs. How do you identify and apply for these opportunities? How are initiatives different than core programs? How can you design effective integrated research? Answer these questions and meet in small groups with Program Officers, get to know what they are looking for, and learn how to ask the right questions, give the right answers, and get funded. This workshop is open to all AGU Fall Meeting attendees and will be particularly helpful to early-career to midcareer participants, especially graduate students, post-docs, researchers, and tenure-track faculty thinking about applying for NSF funding for the first time. Co-sponsored by the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU Education.

Facilitated by Meredith Hastings

Featuring NSF program officers from across the Geosciences Directorate

 

Getting on the Tenure Track and Succeeding

1:00 – 3:00 PM, Wednesday, December 17th

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate C2, Open to All

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2014/events/the-earth-science-womens-network-presents-getting-on-the-tenure-track-and-succeeding-workshop/

The tenure track can seem mysterious: a few crucial years where new professors build a research program, develop a teaching portfolio, and hope to be promoted. In this workshop, we aim to de-mystify the process, and share secrets to success. This workshop is geared towards assistant professors on the tenure-track now, as well as grad students and post-docs considering an academic career; all are invited. This workshop is possible through a partnership of the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU Education.

Moderated by Becca Barnes

Featured panelists:

Megan Anderson, Associate Professor, Colorado College

Maura Hahnenberger, Lecturer (tenure-track), Salt Lake Community College

Tara Hudiburg, Assistant Professor, Univ of Idaho

Maureen Long, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Caroline Masiello, Associate Professor, Rice University

 

Opportunities Beyond Academia 

3:00 – 5:00 PM, Wednesday, December 17th

San Francisco Marriott Marquis – Golden Gate C2, Open to All

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2014/events/the-earth-science-womens-network-presents-opportunities-beyond-academia-workshop/

Thinking about a career outside of academia? It can often be difficult to get help finding a job in a non-profit or government agency, within industry, or as a consultant – after all your advisor is an academic and most likely doesn’t have “first-hand knowledge.” Maybe you want to stay in academia but are interested in working as a consultant or even starting your own business. This workshop will discuss practical skills for making the transition to successful post-graduate careers (yes, there is life after the MS/PhD!). A panel of scientists with experience outside of academia will share their “lessons learned” and answer your questions about how to find and apply for jobs in policy, federal research labs, state agencies, NGOs, industry, and private enterprise. Geared towards graduate students and post-docs who are considering options outside of academia, as well as faculty who are interested; all are invited. This workshop is a partnership between the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU Education.

Moderated by Erika Marin-Spiotta

Panelists:

Kate Dennis, Product Manager, Picarro, Inc.

Jennifer Pett-Ridge, Research Scientist, Department of Energy Lawrence Livermore National Lab

Mona Behl, Research Coordinator and Climate Science Specialist Texas Sea Grant College Program, Texas A&M University

Jessica Thompson, Senior Geologist at ConocoPhillips

Julia Rosen, Freelance journalist

Dena Vallano, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Research Fellow at US Environmental Protection Agency

Katherine Hoag, Environmental Scientist at US EPA

Meredith Kurpius, Chief Air Quality Analysis Office at US EPA

University of Wisconsin-Madison Hosts ESWN Leadership Board

uwcrestThe University of Wisconsin-Madison is hosting the ESWN Leadership Board this week! Come join us for many amazing events! If you can’t make it in person, you can still watch the webcast of the Weston Roundtable discussion. We look forward to seeing many of you in Madison!

Thursday, November 20
  • 9:00-12:00 and 1:30-3:00 You can set up a meeting with a visiting board member http://www.signupgenius.com/go/20f0e49aeab2ea1f85-uwmadison
  • 4:00-5:15 The ESWN Leadership Board will present at the Weston Roundtable (a public seminar); “Building Communities to Build Careers – Lessons from the Earth Science Women’s Network” 1106 Mechanical Engineering, 1513 University Avenue. Coffee, tea, and cookies at 4:00 PM. This will also be available as a webcast! The link is at this URL: http://www.sage.wisc.edu/news.html
 Friday, November 21
  • 8:30-9:45 The Department of Geography and Women in Geography present: “Getting Out in the Field — How to create a positive field experience with a diverse team,” an informal discussion with the Earth Science Women’s Network. 175 Science Hall, 550 North Park Street. Coffee and bagels will be provided.
  • 11:00-12:30 The ESWN Leadership Board hosts “Life after the Ph.D. — Q & A for current, recent, and future grads in science and engineering fields” Lunch provided. At Union South, check Today in the Union board for the room number.
  • 5:30 ESWN Hangout (dinner, happy hour, etc.) at the Union South Sett, meeting point to be announced – check back here later!

ESWN: The Non-Profit

ESWN-LogoHorizontalStars

Press Coverage:

Press Release from the University of Wisconsin–Madison

Press Release from Brown University

New Non-Profit Launches to Promote Women in Science

Press Contacts: 

Prof. Tracey Holloway, taholloway@wisc.edu Cell 608.443.6678 

Prof. Meredith Hastings, Meredith_Hastings@brown.edu Cell 206.778.9656

 

PRESS RELEASE – Wednesday, October 8, 2014

 

Rarely is a new non-profit organization born with an international reputation, over 2000 members, and a mandate to improve the lives of women in science. But, that happened today, as the Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN) formally launched itself as an organization dedicated to the career development for women in the geosciences.

Although ESWN has been serving women in oceanography, atmospheric science, geology, and other branches of the earth sciences for over a decade, the transition to a non-profit is a major step forward for the group. Until now ESWN operated as an informal network of scientists, with activities coordinated by an eight-person leadership board of early- and mid-career women. Core activities include online discussions, peer mentoring, and networking events organized by members from Honolulu, Hawaii to Kiel, Germany.

Tracey Holloway, a professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-founder of ESWN says, “It is amazing all the things we were able to do as a grassroots organization – until now, we never even had a group bank account!” For the past ten years, ESWN has received support from a wide range of organizations and universities, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The group has benefited from a wide range of in-kind support, including event co-hosting and web servers from the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and part-time staff support funded by the University of Wisconsin–Madison 4W Initiative for Women and Wellbeing. Without a standing budget, however, ESWN was not able to reserve event spaces, pay for website maintenance, or even cover the cost of a conference call.

Now, the group’s leadership hopes to engage donors to invest in the successful programs of ESWN, and to better serve the needs of female graduate students and scientists. Holloway says, “Now, we can do basic things like host meetings and maintain our website, as well as launch exciting new initiatives.” These include broadening access to professional development workshops, extending the scope of ESWN activities to include college and high school students, and providing small grants to overcome barriers to career success.

Meredith Hastings, a Brown University assistant professor and ESWN co-founder emphasizes how small investments can really make a difference. “I have two little girls, ages two and three — luckily my university [Brown] has provided some extra support for childcare for work-related travel… but this is really unusual. Many of our members have to limit career-advancing travel, like giving talks at major conferences or doing fieldwork because they cannot afford to bring their kids and care-provider with, nor can they afford to leave them at home and hire extra babysitters. It is a catch-22, where a small amount of support could make a huge difference.”

ESWN is led by a board of eight scientists, spanning career stages, work environments, and regions from Florida to Wisconsin, Colorado to Rhode Island. More information on ESWN is available at www.eswnonline.org.

 

ESWN Member Tami Bond Named a MacArthur Fellow

Tami BondLong-time ESWN Member Tami Bond has been awarded the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship. MacArthur fellows are “talented individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction”(MacArthur Foundation).

Tami is an environmental engineer and professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research is aimed at understanding the effects of black carbon emissions on human health and climate. Black carbon is created whenever something is burned, but emissions vary considerably by source. Tami works at the interface between energy consumption and global atmospheric chemistry and measures black carbon’s physical, chemical, and optical properties. She was selected by the MacArthur Foundation in part because her studies have indicated that “global black carbon emissions are one of the most important contributions to anthropogenic climate change.” She translates her research to be more suitable for policy application, and is helping millions around the world breathe cleaner air.

According to Tami, while in grad school, she “wanted to know about the entire lifetime of combustion products, which begin in the heart of the flame, proceed through the tailpipe (or exhaust stack), waft into the atmosphere, interact with other chemicals or with solar radiation, and eventually get changed into another chemical or get stuck on raindrops, the earth, trees, lungs.” This interest in the entire cycle led Tami to receive an Interdisciplinary Ph.D. from the University of Washington with advisors from the departments of Civil Engineering, Atmospheric Sciences, and Mechanical Engineering. Tami’s sister, Robin Schneider, (also an ESWN member, and one of 7 siblings) thinks that “Tami’s interdisciplinary Ph.D. is a sign of her genius – she inherently understands connections without arbitrary limitations imposed by others/academia.” Tami is a passionate scientist, and we are proud that she is a long-time ESWN member.

You can read more about Tami’s work here and visit her website here.