Women in science blog

Hi, I have started a blog on issues relevant for women in science and women (or man!) in general. I will be writing about diversity in the workplace (with particular attention to science when my experience is), work-and-life balance, gender …

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The gender imbalance

The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) this month launched a study into the root causes of gender disparity in scientific research. The study, which is being run by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), has allocated between …

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Why Can’t a Woman Be More Like a Man?

Women now earn 57 percent of bachelors degrees and 59 percent of masters degrees. According to the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2006 was the fifth year in a row in which the majority of research Ph.D.’s awarded to U.S. citizens …

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Nurturing a Baby and a Start-Up Business

Fledgling companies are like sticky-fingered toddlers. You’ve got to watch them every single minute.

And yet a small group of women is proving that it’s possible to start a high-growth technology company and have children at the same time. They …

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To work or not shouldn’t be a question

We are a two-scientist couple, an Austrian and a German, both with experience working in the United States. So we read with great interest the Working Life story in which Michelle Gabriele Sandrian, an American, shared her experience working as …

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Men and Mothering

University policies and academic culture continue to discourage men from being active parents

It’s no secret that more than 40 years after Title VII guaranteed them equal treatment in the workplace, women with children still go home from work and …

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Spotlight on Women in Fisheries

The list of women in fisheries who are making an impact is vast and ever growing. Fisheries recently interviewed six of the best – a collection of women involved at all levels in AFS: Diane Elliott (Research Microbiologist at the …

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Women Scientists in the Americas

This publication contains a series of interviews with eminent female scientists from the Americas. It aims to offer readers throughout North, Central and South America an account of their remarkable careers. These women relate their dreams, motivations and the story …

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The Gender Gap on Service

For years, women in academe have complained that they are assigned a disproportionate share of departmental service duties — work that needs to be done but that doesn’t carry much weight when it’s time to decide who gets promoted.

A …

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Salary, Gender and the Social Cost of Haggling

About 10 years ago, a group of graduate students lodged a complaint with Linda C. Babcock, a professor of economics at Carnegie Mellon University: All their male counterparts in the university’s PhD program were teaching courses on their own, whereas …

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The Feminine Critique

DON’T get angry. But do take charge. Be nice. But not too nice. Speak up. But don’t seem like you talk too much. Never, ever dress sexy. Make sure to inspire your colleagues — unless you work in Norway, in …

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Women, work and the art of gender judo

When asked at a September fundraiser in San Francisco how she manages as a woman in the Senate, Kirsten Gillibrand explained that most senators are older men, so they see her as a daughter. Rather than dismissing her, they have …

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Women in Science

“Today, women are in the mainstream of science and many of the world’s top scientists are women.
In fact, the face of modern science would be unrecognisable without the major contributions made by women, including more than a dozen Nobel …

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Women in science – passion and prejudice

“Scientific research requires special talents, just as much as intelligence, passion and diligence. I do not know a single successful scientist who is really lazy, and only very few who are able to pursue at the same time other interests …

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Why Men Still Get More Promotions Than Women

Here are two articles. The first one is “The Ivory Ceiling of Service Work.”

“How does a successful associate professor with a distinguished publication record, a visible leadership role among women scientists on campus, and prestigious grant funding for interdisciplinary …

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Reality Check

When I started teaching chemistry at a women’s college 10 years ago, a sophomore named Tahnee came to me and said she wasn’t very good at math, so was a bit nervous about taking chemistry. She wanted to become a …

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Women Count

I am a counter by nature. I count things as an effective way to occupy my mind. How many people are in this room? How many are women? How many are wearing glasses? How many people are using a Mac …

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The Real Barriers for Women in Science

Women are seriously underrepresented on academic science and engineering faculties because of a mix of “unintentional” biases and outdated institutional policies and structures, a National Academies committee said in a report Monday.

The report, the latest in a recent drumbeat …

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Science in Greenland: It’s a Girl Thing

Is Being a Scientist All About the Science? Actually, It Is!
Science in Greenland: It’s a Girl Thing is a video created by a group of Dartmouth women graduate students who did field work in Greenland to interest girls and …

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Nurturing Women Scientists

Nationwide and institution-sized surveys show a leaky pipeline partially patched, but the reservoir still far from full.

When the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) surveyed its postdoctoral fellows in 2003, more than 1,300 of them answered questions ranging from …

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Nature vs Nurture: Girls and STEM

In a New England pub after a conference, our male academic colleagues shrug their collective shoulders at the gender imbalance; in their opinion, women drop out of science because their hormones make them “different”. As women in science know all …

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MS PHDs

From the webpage: “The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD’S®) initiative was developed by and for underrepresented minorities with the overall purpose of facilitating our increased participation in Earth system science.

The …

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Leadership Training fro Early Career Researchers

A decade ago, the “sink or swim” culture was widespread in research. But academic institutions across the United States and Europe are now investing resources in helping young researchers gain the skills they need for climbing the career ladder. Top …

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Leaks in the pipeline

Family issues can cause women to abandon academia at every rung of the career ladder. Policy- makers have addressed some ways to get more women on to the lower rungs of the ladder. But solutions at the higher steps — …

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Improving Your Success in AGU Honors

To reduce the barriers for engagement and success in this essential scientific enterprise, the American Geophysical Union is working to build a more transparent culture around the awards and nomination process.…

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Informal relations

Women are more likely to realize career benefits from informal relationships with colleagues and others if they are in a discipline that comprises at least 15% women and are not simply tokens, finds
a study.…

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Housework Is an Academic Issue

Scientists are likely not to be interested in thinking about housework. Since René Descartes, Western culture has stringently separated matters of mind from body. Housework is, however, related to the life of the mind. Scientists wear clean clothes to the …

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Igniting Girls’ Interest in Science

Girls’ interest, participation, and achievement in science decline as they advance in grade levels. For example, in fourth grade, the number of girls and boys who like math and science is about the same, but by eighth grade, twice as …

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Hope for Graduate School Childbirth Policies

A majority of prospective and current female graduate students believe that academia is incompatible with a fulfilling family life. These concerns are exacerbated when institutional support regarding childbirth is unstated, incoherent across disciplines, or informal in nature.…

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Harassment in Science, Replicated

As an undergraduate student in biology, I spent several weeks in Costa Rica one summer with an older graduate student on a research project deep in the cloud forest. It was just the two of us, and upon arriving at …

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Gender Relations as a Particular Form of Social Relations

The attempt by Foord and Gregson (1986) to reconceptualize ’patriarchy’ through realist methods of analysis is excellent. We find ourselves in particular agreement with their arguments concerning the superiority of the concept ’gender relations’ over ’gender roles’, and with their …

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From Summers to Sommers

Lest anyone think the academic world has settled into a consensus on the status of women in the sciences during the two years since a very public controversy thrust the issue onto the national stage, Christina Hoff Sommers all but …

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Gender imbalance in US geoscience academia

Geoscientists explain women’s under-representation in our field along three dominant themes: the structure of academia, historically low numbers of women, and women’s views and choices. Which factor they perceive as most important depends overwhelmingly on their gender.…

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