Leadership Training fro Early Career Researchers

A decade ago, the “sink or swim” culture was widespread in research. But academic institutions across the United States and Europe are now investing resources in helping young researchers gain the skills they need for climbing the career ladder. Top …

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Leaks in the pipeline

Family issues can cause women to abandon academia at every rung of the career ladder. Policy- makers have addressed some ways to get more women on to the lower rungs of the ladder. But solutions at the higher steps — …

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Improving Your Success in AGU Honors

To reduce the barriers for engagement and success in this essential scientific enterprise, the American Geophysical Union is working to build a more transparent culture around the awards and nomination process.…

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International Contact and Research Performance

The scope of this article is to illuminate the relationship between degree of international contact and research performance among researchers in small countries. Comparisons are done between the natural, medical and social sciences, technology and the humanities. Three indicators on …

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Informal relations

Women are more likely to realize career benefits from informal relationships with colleagues and others if they are in a discipline that comprises at least 15% women and are not simply tokens, finds
a study.…

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Housework Is an Academic Issue

Scientists are likely not to be interested in thinking about housework. Since René Descartes, Western culture has stringently separated matters of mind from body. Housework is, however, related to the life of the mind. Scientists wear clean clothes to the …

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Immigrants’ Success in Science Education and Careers

Written by ESWN member, Gyami Shrestha.

“The contribution of immigrants to the scientific and technological innovation and
progress of the United States is significant. Beyond the existing statistics describing their
status, this study explored the factors driving such immigrants’ success …

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Igniting Girls’ Interest in Science

Girls’ interest, participation, and achievement in science decline as they advance in grade levels. For example, in fourth grade, the number of girls and boys who like math and science is about the same, but by eighth grade, twice as …

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How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper

An essential guide for succeeding in today’s competitive environment, this book provides beginning scientists and experienced researchers with practical advice on writing about their work and getting published. This new, updated edition discusses the latest print and Internet resources. Preparing, …

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Heatstroke: Nature in an Age of Global Warming

Around the world, climate change is indicated by natural events-especially in shifting migration routes-leading to results familiar (species die-out) and unexpected-like the discovery of a heretofore unprecedented “pizzly,” a bear cub with one polar parent and one grizzly. In this …

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Hope for Graduate School Childbirth Policies

A majority of prospective and current female graduate students believe that academia is incompatible with a fulfilling family life. These concerns are exacerbated when institutional support regarding childbirth is unstated, incoherent across disciplines, or informal in nature.…

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Harassment in Science, Replicated

As an undergraduate student in biology, I spent several weeks in Costa Rica one summer with an older graduate student on a research project deep in the cloud forest. It was just the two of us, and upon arriving at …

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Gender Relations as a Particular Form of Social Relations

The attempt by Foord and Gregson (1986) to reconceptualize ’patriarchy’ through realist methods of analysis is excellent. We find ourselves in particular agreement with their arguments concerning the superiority of the concept ’gender relations’ over ’gender roles’, and with their …

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Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast

David Archer’s book is an accessible, entertaining, but detailed account of how scientists are trying to predict future climate change. It is an excellent book and should be the first port of call for anyone wanting to delve deeper into …

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From Summers to Sommers

Lest anyone think the academic world has settled into a consensus on the status of women in the sciences during the two years since a very public controversy thrust the issue onto the national stage, Christina Hoff Sommers all but …

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Gender imbalance in US geoscience academia

Geoscientists explain women’s under-representation in our field along three dominant themes: the structure of academia, historically low numbers of women, and women’s views and choices. Which factor they perceive as most important depends overwhelmingly on their gender.…

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Four Ways Women Stunt Their Careers Unintentionally

Looking back through scores of interviews we’ve conducted in the course of training and coaching engagements, and returning to the 360 reports, these are the four specific low-confidence behaviors cited by managers (male and female alike):
-Being overly modest
-Not …

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Enough is Enough

Power differentials among individuals are inevitable and they certainly exist in academia, where power comes from the perception that an individual is more influential and has greater access to resources than the majority of their peer group. This influence then …

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Earth: The Operator’s Manual

Since the discovery of fire, humans have been energy users and always will be. And this is a good thing-our mastery of energy is what separates us from the rest of the animal kingdom and has allowed us to be …

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Encounters with the Archdruid

In “Encounters with the Archdruid” John McFee recounts three episodes in the life of famous environmental activist David Brower. The three people he encounters are a geologist, a land developer, and a dam builder.According to a review from the Wall …

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El tesoro de una científica rebelde

Ana Roqué de Duprey (1853-1933) was an educator, suffragist, and one of the founders of the University of Puerto Rico. This article talks about her book “Botánica antillana” in which she described more than 6,000 species of plants and trees. …

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Dual-Career Couples and Academic Science

Society is increasingly accepting women in the work force, couples are having fewer children and sharing more responsibilities, and employers are increasingly faced with the task of recruiting and accommodating both men and women who are making career decisions constrained …

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Does gender matter?

The suggestion that women are not advancing in science because of innate inability is being taken seriously by some high-profile academics. Ben A. Barres explains what is wrong with the hypothesis.…

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Diet for a New America

“Diet for a New America” is John Robbins expose of America’s “factory farms”. Since the 1987 publication of Diet for a New America, beef consumption in the United States has fallen a remarkable 19%. While many forces are contributing to …

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Do Babies Matter in Science?

Federal investigators of Title IX, the law that forbids sexual discrimination in education, have only recently discovered that there may be a problem for women in science.

Investigators for the National Science Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and …

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Diversity Isn’t Rocket Science, Is It?

Back in the bad old days, the workplace was a battleground, where sexist jokes and assumptions
were the norm.

Women were shut off from promotion by an old boys’ network that favored its own. They went to meetings and were …

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Does gender bias influence awards given by societies?

AGU is a participant in a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded project called Advancing Ways of Awarding Recognition in Disciplinary Societies (AWARDS), which seeks to examine whether gender bias affects selection of recipients of society awards. AGU is interested in …

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Dirt: the erosion of civilization

David R. Montgomery is a geomorphologist who studies how landscapes change through time, argues persuasively that soil is humanity’s most essential natural resource and essentially linked to modern civilization’s survival. In “Dirt: the erosion of civilization” he traces the history …

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Coal: A Human History

Coal has transformed societies and shaped the fate of nations. It launched empires and triggered wars. Above all, it fuelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain, propelling the rise of a small rural kingdom into the greatest commercial empire in the …

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Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed

Jared Diamond’s “Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed” is a follow-up to his Pulitzer Prize winning book “Guns, Germs and Steel”. In “Collapse” the author explores how climate change, the population explosion and political discord create the conditions …

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Competition and Careers in Biosciences

The rapid progress of biomedical research should be rewarding young scientists with bright careers. Instead, the National Research Council (NRC) reports a “crisis of expectations” as career opportunities fall short of those in comparable occupations. Our analysis suggests that the …

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Bias Persists for Women of Science, a Study Finds

Science professors at American universities widely regard female undergraduates as less competent than male students with the same accomplishments and skills, a new study by researchers at Yale concluded.

As a result, the report found, the professors were less likely …

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Beauty and the Beast: The Aesthetic Moment in Science

Beauty and Science. Where’s the connection? Doesn’t science have more to do with the quantifiable, the verifiable, and the applicable than with beauty?The relationship between scientific discovery and the pursuit of beauty has existed for centuries. In the earliest years …

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At the Helm: Leading Your Laboratory

Since 2002, the first edition of this best-selling book has helped thousands of newly appointed principal investigators successfully transition to running their own labs. But changes in technology continue to transform the way science is done, affecting ways in which …

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Articles from Nature about women in science

Science remains institutionally sexist. Despite some progress, women scientists are still paid less, promoted less frequently, win fewer grants and are more likely to leave research than similarly qualified men. This special issue of Nature takes a hard look at …

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A Test Case for Sexual Harassment

Philosophy professors at the University of Colorado’s flagship campus here thought they were taking a bold step.

They wanted to help solve their field’s longstanding problems over the treatment of women and find ways to improve the climate on their …

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A Lab of Their Own

Attract them as students and recruit them as faculty. Do what you can to keep them in the academy. That’s generally been the mantra of those who are concerned about the dearth of women in university science.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute …

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2009 Nobels: Break or Breakthrough for Women?

Article from 2009

“The first Nobel Prizes were awarded in 1901. But this is the first year that more than one woman has been chosen as a science laureate. Indeed, the four distinguished scientists in the class of 2009—Elizabeth Blackburn …

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A New Frontier for Title IX: Science

Until recently, the impact of Title IX, the law forbidding sexual discrimination in education, has been limited mostly to sports. But now, under pressure from Congress, some federal agencies have quietly picked a new target: science.

The National Science Foundation, …

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A Short Guide to Writing about Biology

Providing students with the tools they’ll need to be successful writers in college and their profession, A Short Guide to Writing about Biology emphasizes writing as a means to examine, evaluate, share, and refine ideas. The text teaches students how …

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A Short Guide to Writing About Chemistry

Providing students with the tools they’ll need to be successful writers, A Short Guide to Writing about Chemistry emphasizes writing as a way of examining, evaluating, and sharing ideas. The book teaches readers how to read critically, study, evaluate and …

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“Why Aren’t More Women in Science?

The year 2006 may be remembered for unprecedented attention given to issues related to women in science. Numerous expert panels — most notably one appointed by the National Academies — examined barriers facing female scientists. A new collection published by …

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