The gender imbalance

The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) this month launched a study into the root causes of gender disparity in scientific research. The study, which is being run by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), has allocated between …

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Why Can’t a Woman Be More Like a Man?

Women now earn 57 percent of bachelors degrees and 59 percent of masters degrees. According to the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2006 was the fifth year in a row in which the majority of research Ph.D.’s awarded to U.S. citizens …

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Use mentoring to fix science inequality

We suggest that mentorship is particularly important for scientists from the developing world. It can address the problem of science inequality while helping to resolve global issues.

Academics in developing countries are rarely able to take advantage of cutting-edge knowledge …

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Peer Mentoring: Career GPS

“We met every other week for 2 years. We discussed imposter syndrome and unearthed myriad ways it was negatively affecting our work. We identified ways to improve our scientific productivity and implemented strategies for effective goal setting. We learned how …

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To work or not shouldn’t be a question

We are a two-scientist couple, an Austrian and a German, both with experience working in the United States. So we read with great interest the Working Life story in which Michelle Gabriele Sandrian, an American, shared her experience working as …

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Men and Mothering

University policies and academic culture continue to discourage men from being active parents

It’s no secret that more than 40 years after Title VII guaranteed them equal treatment in the workplace, women with children still go home from work and …

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Nurturing a Baby and a Start-Up Business

Fledgling companies are like sticky-fingered toddlers. You’ve got to watch them every single minute.

And yet a small group of women is proving that it’s possible to start a high-growth technology company and have children at the same time. They …

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Spotlight on Women in Fisheries

The list of women in fisheries who are making an impact is vast and ever growing. Fisheries recently interviewed six of the best – a collection of women involved at all levels in AFS: Diane Elliott (Research Microbiologist at the …

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Women Scientists in the Americas

This publication contains a series of interviews with eminent female scientists from the Americas. It aims to offer readers throughout North, Central and South America an account of their remarkable careers. These women relate their dreams, motivations and the story …

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Salary, Gender and the Social Cost of Haggling

About 10 years ago, a group of graduate students lodged a complaint with Linda C. Babcock, a professor of economics at Carnegie Mellon University: All their male counterparts in the university’s PhD program were teaching courses on their own, whereas …

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The Feminine Critique

DON’T get angry. But do take charge. Be nice. But not too nice. Speak up. But don’t seem like you talk too much. Never, ever dress sexy. Make sure to inspire your colleagues — unless you work in Norway, in …

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Women, work and the art of gender judo

When asked at a September fundraiser in San Francisco how she manages as a woman in the Senate, Kirsten Gillibrand explained that most senators are older men, so they see her as a daughter. Rather than dismissing her, they have …

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Women in Science

“Today, women are in the mainstream of science and many of the world’s top scientists are women.
In fact, the face of modern science would be unrecognisable without the major contributions made by women, including more than a dozen Nobel …

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Women in science – passion and prejudice

“Scientific research requires special talents, just as much as intelligence, passion and diligence. I do not know a single successful scientist who is really lazy, and only very few who are able to pursue at the same time other interests …

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The Gender Gap on Service

For years, women in academe have complained that they are assigned a disproportionate share of departmental service duties — work that needs to be done but that doesn’t carry much weight when it’s time to decide who gets promoted.

A …

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Why Men Still Get More Promotions Than Women

Here are two articles. The first one is “The Ivory Ceiling of Service Work.”

“How does a successful associate professor with a distinguished publication record, a visible leadership role among women scientists on campus, and prestigious grant funding for interdisciplinary …

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Reality Check

When I started teaching chemistry at a women’s college 10 years ago, a sophomore named Tahnee came to me and said she wasn’t very good at math, so was a bit nervous about taking chemistry. She wanted to become a …

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Women Count

I am a counter by nature. I count things as an effective way to occupy my mind. How many people are in this room? How many are women? How many are wearing glasses? How many people are using a Mac …

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The Real Barriers for Women in Science

Women are seriously underrepresented on academic science and engineering faculties because of a mix of “unintentional” biases and outdated institutional policies and structures, a National Academies committee said in a report Monday.

The report, the latest in a recent drumbeat …

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Nurturing Women Scientists

Nationwide and institution-sized surveys show a leaky pipeline partially patched, but the reservoir still far from full.

When the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) surveyed its postdoctoral fellows in 2003, more than 1,300 of them answered questions ranging from …

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The Inquisition of Climate Science

This book is about the politics of climate change denial. James Lawrence Powell comprehensively take on the climate science denial movement and the deniers themselves, exposing their lack of credentials, their extensive industry funding, and their failure to provide any …

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The Control of Nature

In “The Control of Nature” writer John McFee turns his attention once more to geology and the human struggle against nature. In one sketch, he explores the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ unrealized plan to divert the flow of the …

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Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature

This is a thought-provoking collection of essays edited by environmental historian William Cronon. In this book scholars such as Carolyn Merchant, Richard White, Kenneth Olwig, Donna Haraway, and others “contribute to an ongoing dialog about the environment.” The book has …

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State of Fear

In “State of Fear” fiction writer Michael Crichton tackles global warming. Millionaire George Morton is about to donate $10 million to the National Environmental Research Fund (NERF) when he suddenly decides against it. His lawyer, Peter Evans, is as surprised …

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The Ultimate Resource 2

Arguing that the ultimate resource is the human imagination coupled to the human spirit, economics Professor Julian Lincoln Simon led a vigorous challenge to conventional beliefs about scarcity of energy and natural resources, pollution of the environment, the effects of …

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Nature vs Nurture: Girls and STEM

In a New England pub after a conference, our male academic colleagues shrug their collective shoulders at the gender imbalance; in their opinion, women drop out of science because their hormones make them “different”. As women in science know all …

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Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet

Possibly the most graphic treatment of global warming that has yet been published, Six Degrees is what readers of Al Gore’s best-selling An Inconvenient Truth or Ross Gelbspan’s Boiling Point will turn to next. Written by the acclaimed author of …

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The Science of Scientific Writing

If the reader is to grasp what the writer means, the writer must understand what the reader needs

Science is often hard to read. Most people assume that its difficulties are born out of necessity, out of the extreme complexity …

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The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

How can we make intelligent decisions about our increasingly technology-driven lives if we don’t understand the difference between the myths of pseudoscience and the testable hypotheses of science? Pulitzer Prize-winning author and distinguished astronomer Carl Sagan argues that scientific thinking …

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What the Best College Teachers Do

What makes a great teacher great? Who are the professors students remember long after graduation? This book, the conclusion of a fifteen-year study of nearly one hundred college teachers in a wide variety of fields and universities, offers valuable answers …

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Writing a solid peer review

Nicolas and Gordon 2011 A quick guide to writing a solid peer review, EOS.
Abstract
Scientific integrity and consensus rely on the peer review process, a defining feature of scientific discourse that subjects the literature forming the foundation of credible …

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Safety while working in the field

Fieldwork plays an important role in initiating students into the geoscience community of practice, providing learning opportunities not possible through classroom lectures, lab work, or computer exercises alone [Mogk and Goodwin, 2012]. It’s no wonder, then, that fieldwork is a …

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